High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Riverhead Essential Edition)
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  • High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Riverhead Essential Edition)

High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Riverhead Essential Edition)

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It has been said often enough that baby boomers are a television generation, but the very funny novel High Fidelity reminds that in away they are the record-album generation as well.

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Format: Trade Paperback

Condition: vg- condition, minor shelf wear, flap-jacket

Size: 5.25"x8.0"

Pages: 318pp., 2005 edition

Others: All defects if any are formulated into pricing. May or may not have previous store stickers. Items were inspected to be clear but may have minor writings/inscriptions.

It has been said often enough that baby boomers are a television generation, but the very funny novel High Fidelity reminds that in away they are the record-album generation as well. This funny novel is obsessed with music; Hornby's narrator is an early-thirtysomething English guy who runs a London record store. He sells albums recorded the old-fashioned way--on vinyl--and is having a tough time making other transitions as well, specifically adulthood. The book is in one sense a love story, both sweet and interesting; most entertaining, though, are the hilarious arguments over arcane matters of pop music.

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Rob is a pop music junkie who runs his own semi-failing record store. His girlfriend, Laura, has just left him for the guy upstairs, and Rob is both miserable and relieved. After all, could he have spent his life with someone who has a bad record collection? Rob seeks refuge in the company of the offbeat clerks at his store, who endlessly review their top five films (Reservoir Dogs...); top five Elvis Costello songs ("Alison"...); top five episodes of Cheers (the one where Woody sang his stupid song to Kelly...). Rob tries dating a singer whose rendition of "Baby, I Love Your Way" makes him cry. But maybe it's just that he's always wanted to sleep with someone who has a record contract. Then he sees Laura again. And Rob begins to think (awful as it sounds) that life as an episode of thirtysomething, with all the kids and marriages and barbecues and k.d. lang CD's that this implies, might not be so bad.

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